Catching Up, Sitting Down, And Starting Again.

Some days it is just hard to achieve anything that you set down to so. I have a headache that is creeping its way into migraine territory, have just been sitting in a room full of ill people at the doctors surgery and have come back to find I am not much further on in what I wanted to do than I was this morning. It’s a day of stops and starts, much like when I want to get a pattern just right.

Over the weekend I knit my Rose Pebbles socks right up to and past the point where I had inserted a row of waste yarn stitches for a short row heel later in the process, but I found I just wanted a slightly firmer, tighter sock, so without much worry I unravelled my work and re-cast on fewer stitches onto a needle one size smaller and now I’m much happier with the resulting fabric.

I also took the opportunity to change the way I had begun the cuff and tweak a couple of details to make the socks the best that they can be. I’m really enjoying knitting this pattern, so much so that I don’t mind the re-knitting I have had to do to get me back to this point. the fabric is squishy and soft, a combination of yarn and stitch coming together to make something lovely.

The socks also got a good deal of attention of their own over the weekend, when we went to stay with Mr Awesome’s grandparents in Grimsby, where there was warm conversation and plenty (plenty) of tea. Awesome Grandad asked many questions about the socks on the needles, noting how complex they looked, and asking how each of the diamonds came out knitted in different colours. I explained how the combination of yarn and stitch came together to produce the effect, and that the socks were a lot simpler than, for example, the ones that I was wearing (my Banana Lace socks), though he had thought that the ones I was currently knitting were much the more complex ones. An illusion of complexity I was pleased with.

Awesome Grandma told of the way she used to cast on whilst Awesome Grandad also spoke of when he used to cast on stitches for his sisters’ knitting when I was showing him the elastic German twisted cast on for Mr Awesome’s giant socks. This bought up the number of different cast-ons there were, which lead to me explaining that there was more than one way to knit, which then lead to me waxing lyrical about English versus Continental styles of knitting and demonstrating both, then moving onto shepherdesses knitting belts and tensioning pins, and how you can tension the yarn around your neck and all sorts of stuff that I dare say nobody was really interested in but too polite to shut me up.

Today, however, I am in no mood for knitting. I want to sit down and read my new book, Mary Thomas’s Book of Knitting Patterns recommended to me by Mer.

It’s a wonderful book, and like my other vintage knitting books (though this is a modern, unabridged reprint rather than a book actually manufactured in the 40s), contains beautiful hand-drawn illustrations to highlight the construction of each stitch.

This book, as with my vintage knitting books, is very word-heavy, which makes it wonderful as an interest book as well as a reference title, which is why I am looking forward to sitting down to read it with a cup of tea. Some parts of the text seem quaint, but that’s what makes it so lovely – it harks back to a bygone era when nobody would dream of calling a knitting book ‘Stitch n Bitch’.

One of the things I have set to work on is a felt sewing project that I hoped to get run up today. I had it in mind to use this as a little creative break from knitting, but it seems that the gremlins that have come and pinched my knitting mojo have also stolen away the  ability to comfortably sew. Hopefully this headache will pass on by tomorrow so I can get these projects properly underway.

10 thoughts on “Catching Up, Sitting Down, And Starting Again.

  1. I personally believe there is very little pain that debilitates more than head pain. When I have a bad headache I am incapable of anything except lying down with my eyes closed and hope to sleep until it goes. I admire your tenacity in trying to do stuff! I hope you feel better tomorrow.

  2. I was in London for a few days from Canada and was able to find a copy of your book at Hatchards. Imagine my surprise and wonder at reading your acknowledgements. Thank you Mimi. ( I also bought my daughter a copy as she has started knitting again and is already much better than I am)
    I am looking forward to reading it and learning some new tricks.
    From years of experience I know your migraine
    pain. I hope you will be feeling better soon. Those socks look awesome. Makes me want to try to knit my first pair. Lace I can do. Socks?
    Love and hugs. Vera/Veracitytrue

  3. I hope you’ll feel better soon, and that this bad migraine will go away. Those socks look awesome, and I like the look of these pieces of felt too, hope we’ll see more of them soon !

  4. Hehe, I think the text is cut off a little, but what it goes on to say is that a line of waste stitches is used to create all those things in a kind of ‘afterthought’ manner. I’ve seen afterthought heels and thumbs called ‘peasant heels’ and ‘peasant thumbs’ so I guess it does follow. The passage did amuse me too, which is partly why I chose that page!

  5. Those socks are going to be wonderful. I have the Mary Thomas book as well as her ‘Knitting Book’ and one of her embroidery books (an original print). They are wonderful to read cover to cover with lots of lovely idiosyncracies. Enjoy. Hope your head is all better now.

  6. I’m crazy about this pattern you’ve come up with, it’s beautiful! I’ve never seen anything that works as well with those troublesome multi-colored yarns — and I’ve spent a lot of time looking. I do hope you publish the pattern – you’d have at least one customer right away! 🙂

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.